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Friday, 19 May 2006

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» The Da Vinci Code - No Gay Content from Queer Beacon
Good movie. Initially, I had high expectations for it, but then I learned about the bad reviews and my expectations were lowered. I guess my low expectations allowed me to actually enjoy the flick. Watch the trailer here. Here, Tom [Read More]

» The Da Vinci Code - No Gay Content from aTypical Joe: A gay New Yorker living in the rural south.
Guest post by Augusto Good movie. Initially, I had high expectations for it, but then I learned about the bad reviews and my expectations were lowered. I guess my low expectations allowed me to actually enjoy the flick. Watch the... [Read More]

Comments

pierre

Very enlightening commentary. thanks for the 'history notes'. You've provided an optic I had never considered -- and I find it quite plausible.

Patrick

You really need to stick to what you know best and leave the rest to those who can give truth without sarcasm. It is no wonder why the world does not take the homosexual society seriously as you so point out in your blogs.

RICHARD COMMENTS: DARLING, YOU HAVE THIS BACKWARDS. IT IS NO WONDER THAT THE WORLD DOES NOT HETEROSEXUAL AND CONSERVATIVE CHRISTIAN AMERICAN SOCIETY SERIOUSLY. WHILE I AM GUILTY OF THE SARCASM, THE DA VINCI BLOG IS ENTIRELY FACTUAL.

carywd

very interesting post, you make some good points

Queer Beacon

Richard, I think this is one of your best posts yet. And I love most of your posts.

I could not agree more with your point, society wants to forget about the gays, so people rarely mention the fact that so many great men and women were gay and "yet" contributed so much to the world (e.g., in Brazil, our greatest sports hero, Ayrton Senna -- the F-1 pilot, is said to have been gay but no one talks about it).

I'll be sure to give credit to your post in my upcoming review of The Da Vinci Code, I'll watch it later today.

Sportin' Life

Richard, excellent post.

You apparently read the Code in the same way I did. It was fun, but the glorification of heterosexuality was a little annoying.

Patrick

Richard Darling, There is no need to shout! I'm sorry if I offened you personally, but you DO NOT have all your facts right and have done just what you accuse the CONSERVATIVES and CHRISTIANS of doing.
Just giving your PERSONAL interpretation does not make anything factual. Just as Leonardo's Last Supper is his OWN interpretation. The Da Vinci Code is a fake piece of trash. Good Fiction, maybe, but still a piece of trash with NO authenticity to back it up.
Someday you may understand and then remember my comments.

Bart

I can't tell if you're serious or not in this post. Yes, Leonardo painted men and woman with great clarity and in the Last Supper, especially with your close-up, it definitely doesn't look like anything but a woman.

Douglas

I'm the artist who painted the other (not Leonardo) Last Supper reproduced here. It's part of a whole series of paintings I did of the Passion of Christ. So far as I know, I'm the first artist to include high heels and cigarettes in a religious painting. Try to top that, Mel Gibson!.
I read the DaVinci Code, a decent page-turner, though I've read better whodunits. I haven't seen the movie yet.
Leonardo was quite gay. That's well established now, and was common knowlege then. Salai was his boyfriend, bodyguard, and business manager. The Duke of Milan who comissioned The Last Supper certainly knew this and did not care. The Franciscan monks, whose dining hall this painting decorates, knew; and if they cared, they were in no position to complain (a painting by Leonardo in the mess hall paid for by the Duke. What's to complain about?).
Leonardo was indifferent to hostile to religion in general, but it's not very likely that he would openly challenge religious authority in a monastery refectory while on the payroll of the Duke of Milan. I don't know where Dan Brown gets the idea that this figure is Mary Magdalene. Italian art of the day (and Flemmish and German art of that time) is full of pretty and femmy Saint Johns swooning next to Jesus at the Last Supper. Jesus' boyfriend? Of course! If Salai posed for anything in a finished work by Leonardo, it would have been this figure. Alas, the painting is so very badly decayed (even after a 10 year restoration) from seepage, war damage, and Leonardo's ill-considered attempt to make some kind of oil painting on a plaster wall that the figure is so indistinct.

Thanks for posting my picture!

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